ceru-10q_20150630.htm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

x

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2015

OR

o

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     .

Commission file number 001-36395

 

CERULEAN PHARMA INC.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

 

Delaware

 

20-4139823

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

 

840 Memorial Drive

Cambridge, MA

 

02139

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(Zip Code)

(617) 551-9600

(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, if Changed Since Last Report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer

 

¨

 

 

  

Accelerated filer

 

¨

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

¨

 

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

  

Smaller reporting company

 

x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  o    No   x

Number of shares of the registrant’s Common Stock, $ 0.0001 par value, outstanding on July 31, 2015: 27,303,452

 

 

 


CERULEAN PHARMA INC.

FORM 10-Q

FOR THE QUARTERLY PERIOD ENDED JUNE 30, 2015

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

Page No.

 

 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Financial Statements

1

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014 (unaudited)

1

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2015
and 2014 (unaudited)

2

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2015
and 2014 (unaudited)

3

 

 

 

 

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (unaudited)

4

 

 

 

Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

10

 

 

 

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

20

 

 

 

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures

20

 

 

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

21

 

 

 

Item 2.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

56

 

 

 

Item 6.

Exhibits

56

 

 

 

 

Signatures

57

 


PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1.

Financial Statements.

CERULEAN PHARMA INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (unaudited)

(in thousands except share data and par value)

 

 

 

June 30, 2015

 

 

December 31, 2014

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

85,476

 

 

$

51,174

 

Accounts receivable, prepaid expenses, and other current assets

 

 

1,609

 

 

 

1,662

 

Total current assets

 

 

87,085

 

 

 

52,836

 

Property and equipment — Net

 

 

366

 

 

 

342

 

Other assets

 

 

653

 

 

 

215

 

Total

 

$

88,104

 

 

$

53,393

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current portion of loan payable

 

$

2,654

 

 

$

3,124

 

Accounts payable

 

 

1,808

 

 

 

1,255

 

Accrued expenses

 

 

3,356

 

 

 

3,648

 

Other liabilities

 

 

27

 

 

 

34

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

7,845

 

 

 

8,061

 

Long-term liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loan payable — net of current portion

 

 

11,833

 

 

 

 

Non-current accrued interest

 

 

224

 

 

 

 

Other

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

Total long-term liabilities

 

 

12,057

 

 

 

7

 

Commitments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.01 par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized, no shares

   issued or outstanding

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, $0.0001 par value;

   120,000,000 shares authorized, 27,300,105 and 20,125,049 shares issued and

   outstanding at June 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, respectively

 

 

3

 

 

 

2

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

208,315

 

 

 

167,104

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(140,116

)

 

 

(121,781

)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

68,202

 

 

 

45,325

 

Total

 

$

88,104

 

 

$

53,393

 

 

See notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 


 

1


CERULEAN PHARMA INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS (unaudited)

(in thousands except per share and share data)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Revenue

 

$

 

 

$

33

 

 

$

 

 

$

80

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

6,678

 

 

 

2,648

 

 

 

11,699

 

 

 

4,143

 

General and administrative

 

 

2,717

 

 

 

2,029

 

 

 

5,398

 

 

 

3,539

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

9,395

 

 

 

4,677

 

 

 

17,097

 

 

 

7,682

 

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income

 

 

1

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

3

 

Interest expense

 

 

(513

)

 

 

(268

)

 

 

(1,242

)

 

 

(729

)

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

 

 

 

(2,493

)

 

 

 

 

 

(2,493

)

Decrease in value of preferred stock warrant liability

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

504

 

Total other (expense) income — net

 

 

(512

)

 

 

(2,759

)

 

 

(1,238

)

 

 

(2,715

)

Net loss attributable to common stockholders

 

$

(9,907

)

 

$

(7,403

)

 

$

(18,335

)

 

$

(10,317

)

Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted

 

$

(0.37

)

 

$

(0.44

)

 

$

(0.78

)

 

$

(1.17

)

Weighted-average common shares outstanding:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted

 

 

26,690,673

 

 

 

16,883,716

 

 

 

23,504,303

 

 

 

8,835,351

 

See notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 


 

2


CERULEAN PHARMA INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (unaudited)

(in thousands)

 

 

 

Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

 

2015

 

 

 

2014

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(18,335

)

 

$

(10,317

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

896

 

 

 

343

 

Noncash rent expense

 

 

(13

)

 

 

2

 

Change in carrying value of preferred stock warrant liability

 

 

 

 

 

(504

)

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

83

 

 

 

63

 

Gain on disposal of property and equipment

 

 

 

 

 

(30

)

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

 

 

 

2,493

 

Noncash interest expense

 

 

791

 

 

 

229

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

532

 

 

 

(174

)

Accounts payable

 

 

503

 

 

 

(335

)

Accrued expenses

 

 

(195

)

 

 

335

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(15,738

)

 

 

(7,895

)

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchases of property and equipment

 

 

(107

)

 

 

(38

)

Proceeds from sale of property and equipment

 

 

 

 

 

40

 

Increase in restricted cash

 

 

(230

)

 

 

 

Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities

 

 

(337

)

 

 

2

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from sale of common stock

 

 

2,472

 

 

 

133

 

Proceeds from issuance of loans payable

 

 

15,000

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of convertible promissory notes

 

 

 

 

 

8,500

 

Payments on loans payable

 

 

(3,921

)

 

 

(1,640

)

Cash paid for debt issuance costs

 

 

(359

)

 

 

(179

)

Proceeds from public stock offering, net of issuance costs

 

 

37,185

 

 

 

59,862

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

50,377

 

 

 

66,676

 

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

34,302

 

 

 

58,783

 

Cash and cash equivalents — Beginning of period

 

 

51,174

 

 

 

5,488

 

Cash and cash equivalents — End of period

 

$

85,476

 

 

$

64,271

 

Supplemental disclosures of noncash investing and financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conversion of redeemable convertible preferred stock into common stock

 

$

 

 

$

81,525

 

Conversion of convertible notes and accrued interest into common stock, net

 

$

 

 

$

20,138

 

Reclassification of warrants to additional paid in capital

 

$

 

 

$

424

 

Supplemental cash flow information — Interest paid

 

$

443

 

 

$

234

 

See notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 


 

3


CERULEAN PHARMA INC.

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1.

NATURE OF BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS

Nature of Business — Cerulean Pharma Inc. (the “Company”) was incorporated on November 28, 2005 as a Delaware corporation and is located in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Company was formed to develop novel, nanotechnology-based therapeutics in the areas of oncology and other diseases.

Basis of Presentation — The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its subsidiary, Cerulean Pharma Australia Pty Ltd, a wholly owned Australian-based proprietary limited company. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated. The consolidated interim financial statements of the Company included herein have been prepared, without audit, pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America have been condensed or omitted from this report, as is permitted by such rules and regulations. Accordingly, these condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the Company’s audited financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2014 and notes thereto, included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, which was filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 19, 2015 (the “2015 10-K”).

The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the same basis as the audited consolidated financial statements. In the opinion of the Company’s management, the accompanying unaudited interim consolidated financial statements contain all adjustments that are necessary to present fairly the Company’s financial position as of June 30, 2015, the results of its operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 and cash flows for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014. Such adjustments are of a normal and recurring nature. The results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2015 are not indicative of the results for the year ending December 31, 2015, or for any future period.

On April 10, 2015, the Company completed the issuance and sale of 6,716,000 shares of common stock in an underwritten public offering at a price to the public of $6.00 per share.  The sale of shares of common stock included 876,000 shares sold pursuant to the full exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares of common stock. The net proceeds to the Company from this offering were $37.2 million after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses payable by the Company.

On April 15, 2014, the Company completed the issuance and sale of 8,500,000 shares of its common stock in its initial public offering (the “IPO”), at a price to the public of $7.00 per share. On May 7, 2014, the Company completed the sale of an additional 1,069,715 shares of common stock at a price to the public of $7.00 per share under a partial exercise by the underwriters of their option to purchase additional shares of common stock. The sale of the shares to the public resulted in net proceeds to the Company of $59.9 million after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses payable by the Company.

In connection with the closing of the IPO, all of the Company’s outstanding redeemable convertible preferred stock and convertible notes automatically converted into shares of common stock as of April 15, 2014, resulting in the issuance by the Company of an additional 9,728,237 shares of common stock. The significant increases in shares outstanding in April 2015 and April 2014 impacts the year-over-year comparability of the Company’s net loss per share calculations.

In connection with the completion of the IPO on April 15, 2014, the Company’s outstanding warrants to purchase 1,857,226 shares of the Company’s preferred stock automatically converted into warrants to purchase an aggregate of 128,663 shares of the Company’s common stock and, as a result, the Company reclassified the warrant liability to additional paid-in capital.

2.

SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

There have been no material changes to the significant accounting policies previously disclosed in the 2015 10-K.

 

4


Recent Accounting PronouncementsIn April 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2015-03, “Interest – Imputation of Interest” (“ASU 2015-03”). To simplify presentation of debt issuance costs, ASU 2015-03 requires that debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the carrying amount of that debt liability, consistent with debt discounts.  ASU 2015-03 is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning January 1, 2016 and is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

3.

NET LOSS PER SHARE ATTRIBUTABLE TO COMMON STOCKHOLDERS

The Company computes diluted loss per common share after giving effect to the dilutive effect of stock options, warrants and shares of unvested restricted stock that are outstanding during the period, except where the inclusion of such securities would be antidilutive.

The Company has reported a net loss for all periods presented and, therefore, diluted net loss per common share is the same as basic net loss per common share.

The following potentially dilutive securities that were outstanding prior to the use of the treasury stock method have been excluded from the computation of diluted weighted-average shares outstanding, because the inclusion of such securities would have an antidilutive impact due to the losses reported (in common stock equivalent shares):

 

 

As of June 30,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Options to purchase common stock

 

 

2,989,627

 

 

 

1,755,786

 

Warrants to purchase common stock

 

 

300,564

 

 

 

128,663

 

4.

ACCRUED EXPENSES

Accrued expenses consist of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

As of June 30,

2015

 

 

As of December 31,

2014

 

Accrued expenses

 

$

538

 

 

$

663

 

Accrued clinical trial costs

 

 

1,396

 

 

 

848

 

Accrued contract manufacturing expenses

 

 

392

 

 

 

580

 

Accrued compensation and benefits

 

 

939

 

 

 

983

 

Accrued interest

 

 

91

 

 

 

574

 

Total accrued expenses

 

$

3,356

 

 

$

3,648

 

 

 

5.

CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE TO SHAREHOLDERS

In February and March 2014, the Company issued convertible promissory notes in the original principal amount of $6.0 million to existing investors and a convertible promissory note in the original principal amount of $2.5 million to a new investor. All of the notes had a stated interest rate of 7.0%. Outstanding principal and unpaid accrued interest due under the notes were automatically converted into shares of the Company’s common stock upon the closing of the IPO at a conversion price equal to 77.5% of the IPO price. The Company recorded a loss on the extinguishment of the notes of $2.5 million in April 2014, equal to the difference between the fair value of the shares into which the notes converted and the carrying amount of the notes upon the closing of the IPO.

6.

LOAN AGREEMENTS

On January 8, 2015 (the “Closing Date”), the Company entered into a term loan facility of up to $26.0 million (the “Term Loan”) with Hercules Technology Growth Capital, Inc. (“Hercules”). The proceeds were used to repay the Company’s existing term loan facility with Lighthouse Capital Partners VI, L.P. (“Lighthouse Capital”) and for general corporate and working capital purposes.

The Term Loan is governed by a loan and security agreement, dated January 8, 2015, between the Company and Hercules (the “Hercules Loan Agreement”). The Hercules Loan Agreement provides for up to three separate borrowings, the first of which was funded in the amount of $15.0 million on the Closing Date. The second borrowing of up to $5.0 million may be drawn by the Company, subject to the satisfaction of customary funding conditions, on or prior to December 15, 2015, provided that the Company meets certain clinical milestones. The third borrowing of up to $6.0 million (the “Term C Loan Advance”) may be drawn, at no less than $3.0 million per draw and subject to the satisfaction of customary funding conditions, on or after September 30, 2015 but before December 15, 2015, provided that between the Closing Date and December 15, 2015, the Company has received net cash proceeds of

 

5


at least $40.0 million from the issuance and sale by the Company of its equity securities and/or upfront cash payments from one or more strategic corporate partnerships.

The Term Loan will mature on July 1, 2018. Each advance under the Term Loan accrues interest at a floating per annum rate equal to the greater of (i) 7.30% or (ii) the sum of 7.30% plus the prime rate minus 5.75%. The Term Loan provides for interest-only payments on a monthly basis until December 31, 2015. The interest only period may be extended at the Company’s option for a three month period if the Company attains certain clinical milestones, and for an additional three month period if the Company attains certain clinical milestones and receives net cash proceeds of at least $30.0 million from the issuance and sale by the Company of its equity securities and/or upfront cash payments from one or more strategic corporate partnerships. Thereafter, payments will be payable monthly in equal installments of principal and interest to fully amortize the outstanding principal over the remaining term of the loan, subject to recalculation upon a change in the prime rate. The Company may prepay the Term Loan in whole or in part upon seven business days’ prior written notice to Hercules. Any such prepayment of the Term Loan is subject to a prepayment charge of (i) 3.0% if such prepayment occurs within twelve months of the Closing Date, (ii) 2.0% if such prepayment occurs after twelve months following the Closing Date but on or prior to twenty-four months following the Closing Date, and (iii) 1.0% thereafter. Amounts outstanding during an event of default are payable upon Hercules’ demand and shall accrue interest at an additional rate of 5.0% per annum of the past due amount outstanding. At the end of the loan term (whether at maturity, by prepayment in full or otherwise), the Company shall pay a final end of term charge to Hercules in the amount of 6.7% of the aggregate original principal amount advanced by Hercules. The amount of the end of term charge is being accrued over the loan term as interest expense.

In connection with the Hercules Loan Agreement, the Company issued to Hercules a warrant to purchase shares of the common stock of the Company at an exercise price of $6.05 per share. The warrant is initially exercisable for 137,521 shares of common stock. On such date (if any) as a Term C Loan Advance is made to the Company, the warrant shall automatically become exercisable for an additional 34,380 shares of common stock. The warrant is exercisable until January 8, 2020. The Company estimated the fair value of the warrant for shares exercisable on the issue date in January 2015 to be $659,000. The value of the warrant was recorded as a discount to the loan and will be amortized to interest expense using the effective interest method over the term of the loan. The fair value of the warrant was estimated on the date of issue for the exercisable shares at that date using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. The following table shows the Black-Scholes assumptions used to value the warrant:

 

 

 

January 8, 2015

 

Contractual life

 

5 years

 

Volatility rate

 

 

61

%

Risk-free interest rate

 

 

1.50

%

Expected dividends

 

 

In connection with the Hercules Loan Agreement, the Company entered into a stock purchase agreement with Hercules, whereby Hercules purchased 135,501 shares of common stock from the Company at a price per share of $7.38, which was equal to the closing price of the common stock on The NASDAQ Global Market on January 7, 2015, for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $1.0 million.

In December 2011, the Company entered into a loan and security agreement with Lighthouse Capital to borrow up to $10.0 million in one or more advances by December 31, 2012.  In both March 2012 and August 2012, the Company borrowed $5.0 million under the loan and security agreement, for a total of $10.0 million. This amount was being repaid over 36 months beginning on December 1, 2012, at an interest rate of 8.25%.   In addition, the Company was required to make an additional payment in the amount of $600,000 at the end of the loan term. The amount was accrued over the loan term as interest expense. The amount accrued as of December 31, 2014 was $574,000, and it was included in accrued expense in the Company’s consolidated balance sheet.  In January 2015, the Company repaid in full the amount outstanding under the Lighthouse Capital loan, or $3.6 million, with the proceeds from the Hercules Loan Agreement.

 

6


In connection with the loan and security agreement with Lighthouse Capital, the Company issued Lighthouse Capital a warrant to purchase a maximum of 66,436 shares of the Company’s Series D Preferred Stock, at an exercise price of $12.04 per share and with an expiration date 10 years from the date of issue (December 2021). The Company determined the fair value of the warrant at the end of each reporting period using the Black-Scholes option pricing model until the warrant converted to a warrant to purchase 66,436 shares of common stock upon the completion of the IPO.  The value of the warrant was recorded as a discount to the loan and was being amortized as interest expense using the effective interest method over the 36-month repayment term.  The unamortized discount relating to the warrants, or $0.2 million, was expensed as interest expense upon repayment of the loan in January 2015.

7.

STOCK OPTION PLAN

A summary of stock option activity for employee, director and nonemployee awards under all stock option plans during the six months ended June 30, 2015 is presented below (Aggregate Intrinsic Value in thousands):

 

 

 

Number of

Shares

 

 

Weighted-

Average

Exercise

Price

 

 

Weighted-

Average

Remaining

Contractual

Life (Years)

 

 

Aggregate

Intrinsic

Value

 

Outstanding — January 1, 2015

 

 

2,126,176

 

 

$

4.97

 

 

 

6.7

 

 

$

2,701

 

Granted

 

 

1,194,062

 

 

 

7.81

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercised

 

 

(323,555

)

 

 

4.55

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forfeited

 

 

(7,056

)

 

 

5.36

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding — June 30, 2015

 

 

2,989,627

 

 

$

6.21

 

 

 

7.5

 

 

$

687

 

Options expected to vest — June 30, 2015

 

 

2,198,792

 

 

$

6.50

 

 

 

7.6

 

 

$

273

 

Options exercisable — June 30, 2015

 

 

679,738

 

 

$

5.22

 

 

 

7.0

 

 

$

399

 

 

The weighted-average per share grant date fair value of options granted during the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 was $7.81 and $3.82, respectively.  

The fair value of each option award is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model based on the assumptions noted in the table below. Expected volatility for the Company’s common stock was determined based on an average of the historical volatility of a peer-group of similar public companies. The Company has limited option exercise information, and as such, the expected term of the options granted was calculated using the simplified method that represents the average of the contractual term of the option and the weighted-average vesting period of the option. The assumed dividend yield is based upon the Company’s expectation of not paying dividends in the foreseeable future. The risk-free rate for periods within the contractual life of the option is based upon the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant.

The Company has recorded stock-based compensation expense related to the issuance of stock option awards to employees of $403,000 and $196,000, for the three months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively, and $823,000 and $343,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively. The assumptions used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model for stock options granted to employees and to directors in respect of board services during the three and six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 are as follows:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

2014

Expected life

 

5.4-6.1 years

 

 

6 years

 

 

5.4-6.1 years

 

6 years

Risk-free interest rate

 

1.8%-2.0%

 

 

1.9%-2.0%

 

 

1.5%-2.0%

 

1.8%-2.0%

Expected volatility

 

 

61

%

 

 

59

%

 

61%-63%

 

59%-60%

Expected dividend rate

 

—%

 

 

—%

 

 

—%

 

—%

During the six months ended June 30, 2015, the Company granted nonemployee stock options to purchase 180,000 shares of the Company’s common stock.  The weighted-average exercise price and the weighted-average grant date fair value of nonemployee stock options granted for the six months ended June 30, 2015 was $5.30 per share and $3.07 per share, respectively.  The fair value of the grants is being expensed over the vesting period of the options on a straight-line basis as the services are being provided.  The Company did not grant any nonemployee stock option grants for the six months ended June 30, 2014.

The Company recorded stock-based compensation expense related to nonemployee awards of $53,000 and $12,000 for the three months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively, and $73,000 and $24,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively. The compensation expense related to nonemployee awards is included in the total stock-based compensation each year

 

7


and is subject to re-measurement until the options vest. The Black-Scholes assumptions used to estimate fair value for the three and six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 were as follows:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

2015

 

 

2014

Expected life

 

10 years

 

 

7 years

 

10 years

 

 

7 years

Risk-free interest rate

 

2.2%-2.3%

 

 

2.0%-2.5%

 

2.2%-2.3%

 

 

2.0%-2.5%

Expected volatility

 

 

59

%

 

55%-59%

 

 

59

%

 

55%-59%

Expected dividend rate

 

—%

 

 

—%

 

—%

 

 

—%

 

 

8.

FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

The Company’s financial instruments consist of cash equivalents, accounts payable, accrued expenses, and debt obligations. The carrying amount of accounts payable and accrued expenses are considered a reasonable estimate of their fair value, due to the short-term maturity of these instruments. The carrying amount of debt is also considered to be a reasonable estimate of the fair value based on the short term nature of the debt and because the debt bears interest at the prevailing market rate for instruments with similar characteristics.

Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. Valuation techniques used to measure fair value are performed in a manner to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs.

The accounting standard describes a fair value hierarchy based on three levels of inputs, of which the first two are considered observable and the last unobservable, that may be used to measure fair value, which are the following:

Level 1 — Quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the market date for identical unrestricted assets or liabilities.

Level 2 — Inputs other than Level 1 that are observable, either directly or indirectly, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs for which all significant inputs are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities.

Level 3 — Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities.

A summary of the financial assets and liabilities that are measured on a recurring basis at fair value as of June 30, 2015 and December 31, 2014, is as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fair Value Measurements Using

 

 

 

Carrying

 

 

Quoted Prices in

Active Markets

for Identical

Assets

 

 

Significant

Other

Observable

Inputs

 

 

Significant

Unobservable

Inputs

 

 

 

Value

 

 

(Level 1)

 

 

(Level 2)

 

 

(Level 3)

 

June 30, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

85,520

 

 

$

 

 

$

85,520

 

 

$

 

December 31, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Money market funds

 

$

50,541

 

 

$

 

 

$

50,541

 

 

$

 

 

The Company’s debt obligations are Level 2 measurements in the fair value hierarchy.

The Company’s money market funds have been valued on the basis of valuations provided by third-party pricing services, as derived from such services’ pricing models. Inputs to the models may include, but are not limited to, reported trades, executable bid and asked prices, broker/dealer quotations, prices or yields of securities with similar characteristics, benchmark curves or information pertaining to the issuer, as well as industry and economic events. The pricing services may use a matrix approach, which considers information regarding securities with similar characteristics to determine the valuation for a security. The Company is ultimately responsible for the consolidated financial statements and underlying estimates. Accordingly, the Company assesses the reasonableness

 

8


of the valuations provided by the third-party pricing services by reviewing actual trade data, broker/dealer quotes and other similar data, which are obtained from quoted market prices or other sources.

No transfers between levels occurred during the periods presented.

 

 

9.

SUBSEQUENT EVENT

On July 9, 2015, the Company entered into a lease agreement (the “Lease”) with AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals Limited Partnership, a Delaware limited partnership (the “Landlord”), for approximately 22,992 square feet of laboratory and office space in Waltham, Massachusetts.  The term of the Lease commences on December 28, 2015 and expires on February 28, 2021, subject to a three-year extension option.

During each of the first two years of the term, the Company’s annual base rent will be $689,760.  Thereafter, the annual base rent will increase annually for the remainder of the term.  In addition to the base rent, the Company is also responsible for its share of the operating expenses, utility costs and real estate taxes, in accordance with the terms of the Lease.  Pursuant to the terms of the Lease, the Company provided a security deposit in the form of a letter of credit in the amount of $229,920.

 

 

9


Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations together with our condensed consolidated financial statements and the related notes appearing elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Some of the information contained in this discussion and analysis or set forth elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including information with respect to our plans and strategy for our business and related financing, includes forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. You should read the “Risk Factors” section of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for a discussion of important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results described in or implied by the forward-looking statements contained in the following discussion and analysis.

Overview

We are a clinical-stage, oncology-focused company applying our proprietary Dynamic Tumor Targeting™ Platform to develop differentiated therapies. This platform utilizes nanoparticle-drug conjugates, or NDCs, which consist of proprietary polymers that are covalently linked to anti-cancer therapeutics, or payloads. We believe these NDCs dynamically target tumors by exploiting the leakiness of new blood vessels in tumors as an entry portal into tumor tissue, followed by active uptake into tumor cells and the sustained release of the anti-cancer payload inside the tumor cells. We believe that our NDCs are differentiated from other nanoparticle technologies by our linker technology, which allows for preferential delivery of our anti-cancer payloads.

During the quarter ended June 30, 2015, we were granted Orphan Drug designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or the FDA, to our lead NDC, CRLX101, for the treatment of ovarian cancer.  We are exploring two combination treatments for relapsed ovarian cancer:  a Phase 2 clinical trial of CRLX101 plus Avastin® (bevacizumab) which is currently enrolling patients, and a Phase 1b clinical trial of CRLX101 plus weekly paclitaxel in collaboration with the GOG Foundation Inc., or GOG Foundation, which was initiated during the quarter.  The FDA’s Orphan Drug Designation Program provides orphan status to drugs and biologics intended to treat, diagnose or prevent rare diseases or disorders, which are defined as diseases or disorders that affect fewer than 200,000 people in the United States. This designation provides certain incentives, including federal grants, tax credits, a waiver of Prescription Drug User Fee Act, or PDUFA, filing fees and a seven-year marketing exclusivity period once the drug or biologic is approved.

The FDA also granted Fast Track designation to CRLX101 in combination with Avastin for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, or RCC, following progression through two or three prior lines of therapy. We are exploring CRLX101 in combination with Avastin in this patient population through our company-sponsored, randomized, controlled Phase 2 clinical trial, and have also supported a Phase 1b/2 single-arm investigator-sponsored trial, or IST, of CRLX101 in combination with Avastin in relapsed RCC.  The FDA’s Fast Track Program is designed to facilitate the development and to expedite the review of drugs that are intended to treat serious conditions and to fulfill an unmet medical need.

Our second NDC, CRLX301, is in Phase 1 clinical development.  On March 27, 2015, the investigational new drug application, or IND, for CRLX301 in the United States became effective, which enables us to conduct clinical trials for CRLX301 in the United States.  In December 2014, we commenced the Phase 1 portion of a Phase 1/2a clinical trial for CRLX301 at two cancer centers in Australia, and we continue to enroll patients on this trial.

On April 10, 2015, we completed an underwritten public offering, or the Secondary Offering, of 6,716,000 shares of common stock, including 876,000 shares sold pursuant to the full exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares, at a public offering price of $6.00 per share. The net proceeds to us from the Secondary Offering were approximately $37.2 million, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses payable by us.

To date, we have devoted substantially all of our resources to our drug discovery and development efforts, including conducting clinical trials of our product candidates, protecting our intellectual property and the general and administrative support of these operations. We have generated no revenue from product sales. We expect that it will be several years before we commercialize a product candidate, if ever. Through June 30, 2015, we have funded our operations primarily through $84.2 million in proceeds from the sale of shares of our convertible preferred stock in private placements, net proceeds of $59.9 million from sales of shares of our common stock in our initial public offering, or IPO, net proceeds of $37.2 million from sales of shares of our common stock in our Secondary Offering, $17.3 million in proceeds from our sale of convertible promissory notes, $10.0 million in proceeds from a loan and security agreement with Lighthouse Capital Partners VI, L.P., or Lighthouse Capital, and $15.0 million in proceeds from a loan and security agreement with Hercules Technology Growth Capital, Inc., or Hercules.  We refer to our loan and security agreements with Lighthouse Capital and Hercules as the Lighthouse Loan Agreement and Hercules Loan Agreement, respectively.

We have never been profitable and have incurred significant operating losses since our incorporation. As of June 30, 2015, we had an accumulated deficit of $140.1 million. We incurred net losses of approximately $18.3 million and $10.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

 

10


We expect to continue to incur significant and increasing expenses and operating losses for the foreseeable future, as we advance our product candidates through preclinical studies and clinical trials, and as we seek regulatory approval for, and eventually commercialize, our product candidates. Our net losses may fluctuate significantly from quarter to quarter and from year to year. We will need to raise additional capital in the future to support our expenses and operating activities.

Financial Operations Overview

Revenue

To date, we have not generated any revenue from product sales and do not expect to generate any revenue from product sales for the next several years, if ever. In the future, we may generate revenue from a combination of product sales, license fees, milestone and research and development payments in connection with strategic partnerships, and royalties resulting from the sales of products developed under licenses of our intellectual property. We expect that any revenue we generate will fluctuate from quarter to quarter as a result of the timing and amount of any such payments. Our ability to generate product revenues will depend on the successful development and eventual commercialization of our product candidates. If we fail to complete the development of our product candidates in a timely manner or to obtain regulatory approval for our product candidates, our ability to generate future revenue and our results of operations and financial position would be materially adversely affected.

To date, our only revenue has consisted of a government tax credit that we received in 2010 and payments in 2011-2014 from four material transfer agreements and a research agreement.

Research and Development Expenses

Research and development expense consists of costs incurred in connection with the discovery and development of our Dynamic Tumor Targeting Platform and our NDCs. These expenses consist primarily of:

·

employee-related expenses, including salaries, benefits and stock-based compensation expense;

·

expenses incurred under agreements with contract research organizations, or CROs, investigative sites that conduct our clinical trials and consultants that conduct a portion of our preclinical studies;

·

expenses relating to scientific and medical consultants and advisors;

·

the cost of acquiring and manufacturing clinical trial materials;

·

facilities, depreciation of fixed assets and other allocated expenses, including direct and allocated expenses for rent and maintenance of facilities and equipment;

·

lab supplies, reagents, active pharmaceutical ingredients and other direct and indirect costs in support of our preclinical and clinical activities;

·

license fees related to in-licensed products and technology; and

·

costs associated with non-clinical activities and regulatory approvals.

We expense research and development costs as incurred.

Conducting a significant amount of research and development is central to our business model. Product candidates in late stages of clinical development generally have higher development costs than those in earlier stages of clinical development primarily due to the increased size and duration of late-stage clinical trials. We plan to increase our research and development expenses for the foreseeable future as we continue to support multiple clinical trials of CRLX101 and CRLX301, and advance our earlier-stage research and development projects.

We use our employee and infrastructure resources across multiple research and development programs. We track external research and development expenses and personnel expense on a program-by-program basis and have allocated expenses such as stock-based compensation and indirect laboratory supplies and services to each program based on the personnel resources allocated to each program. Facilities, depreciation and scientific advisory board fees and expenses are not allocated to a program and are considered overhead. Below is a summary of our research and development expenses for the three months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 (in thousands):

 

11


 

 

Three Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

Six Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

CRLX101

 

$

5,030

 

 

$

1,875

 

 

$

8,372

 

 

$

2,768

 

CRLX301

 

 

827

 

 

 

360

 

 

 

1,715

 

 

 

524

 

Dynamic Tumor Targeting platform

 

 

487

 

 

 

234

 

 

 

935

 

 

 

514

 

Overhead

 

 

334

 

 

 

179

 

 

 

677

 

 

 

337

 

Total research and development expense

 

$

6,678

 

 

$

2,648

 

 

$

11,699

 

 

$

4,143

 

The following summarizes our research and development programs.

CRLX101

Our lead product candidate, CRLX101, is an NDC in Phase 2 clinical development. We are pursuing development of CRLX101 in combination with anti-cancer therapies in multiple ongoing clinical development programs that include company-sponsored trials and ISTs.  These trials consist of:

Relapsed renal cell carcinoma:

-

A Phase 2 randomized, controlled, company-sponsored trial is being conducted comparing CRLX101 administered in combination with Avastin to investigator’s choice of standard of care in patients with RCC who have received two or three prior lines of therapy.  We refer to this clinical trial as the RCC Trial.                     

-

A Phase 1b/2 single-arm IST of CRLX101 in combination with Avastin.

Relapsed ovarian cancer:

-

A Phase 1b single-arm, company-sponsored trial of CRLX101 in combination with weekly paclitaxel in patients with relapsed ovarian cancer being conducted in collaboration with the GOG Foundation.

-

A Phase 2 IST of CRLX101 as monotherapy (in one arm) and in combination with Avastin (in a separate arm) in patients with relapsed ovarian cancer.

Neoadjuvant rectal cancer:

-

A Phase 1b/2 single-arm IST of CRLX101 in combination with chemoradiotherapy in patients with non-metastatic rectal cancer.

We cannot accurately project future research and development expenses for our CRLX101 program because such expenses are dependent on a number of variables, including, among others, the cost and design of any additional clinical trials, the duration of the regulatory process and the results of any clinical trials.

Under our license agreement with Calando Pharmaceuticals, Inc., or Calando, pursuant to which we obtained rights to CRLX101, or the CRLX101 Agreement, we are obligated to pay milestone payments which could total, in the aggregate, $32.8 million, if we achieve certain development and sales events with CRLX101. In addition, under the CRLX101 Agreement, if we, or one of our affiliates, sell CRLX101 we are required to pay tiered royalty payments ranging from low- to mid-single digits, as a percentage of worldwide net sales, depending on whether there is patent protection for CRLX101 at the time of the sale. In the event we license or sublicense the intellectual property that we purchased or licensed from Calando, we are required to pay Calando a percentage of the income we receive from the licensee or sublicensee to the extent attributable to such license or sublicense, subject to certain exceptions. The percentage of such license income that we are obligated to pay Calando ranges from the low- to mid-double digits depending on the development stage of CRLX101 at the time we first provide or receive draft terms of a license arrangement with the third party that results in a license agreement.

CRLX301

CRLX301 is currently in early stage clinical development, with a Phase 1 trial ongoing.  Assuming we are successful in establishing a safe maximum tolerated dose, or MTD, and/or a recommended Phase 2 dose in the Phase 1 trial, we plan to rapidly advance CRLX301 into Phase 2 development in selected solid tumors.

Under our license agreement with Calando pursuant to which we obtained rights to Calando’s cyclodextrin system for purposes of conjugating or complexing certain other therapeutic agents to the system, or the Platform Agreement, we paid a $250,000 clinical development milestone to Calando in January 2015 in connection with the initiation of our Phase 1 clinical trial of CRLX301 in

 

12


December 2014. We are also required to make milestone payments in an aggregate amount of up to $18.0 million to Calando if we achieve certain development and sales events with respect to any cyclodextrin-based, or CDP-based, product.  Further, under the Platform Agreement, if we, or one of our affiliates, sell CRLX301, or any CDP-based product, we are required to pay tiered royalty payments ranging from low- to mid-single digits, as a percentage of worldwide net sales, depending on whether there is patent protection at the time of the sale. In the event we license or sublicense the intellectual property that we purchased or licensed from Calando, we are required to pay Calando a percentage of the income we receive from the licensee or sublicensee to the extent attributable to such license or sublicense, subject to certain exceptions. The percentage of such license income that we are obligated to pay Calando is in the low-double digits.

Nanoparticle-Drug Conjugates or NDCs

We expect that the expenses related to our NDCs will continue to increase as we seek to identify additional targets for preclinical research and add personnel to these projects. We cannot accurately predict future research and development expenses for our NDCs because such costs are dependent on a number of variables, including the success of preclinical studies on any such NDC.

The successful development of any of our NDCs is highly uncertain. As such, at this time, we cannot reasonably predict with certainty the duration and costs of the current or future preclinical studies or clinical trials of any of our NDCs or if, when or to what extent we will generate revenues from any commercialization and sale of any of our NDCs that obtain marketing approval. We may never succeed in achieving regulatory approval for any of our NDCs. The duration, costs and timing of development of our NDCs will depend on a variety of factors, including:

the scope and rate of progress of our ongoing clinical trials;

a continued acceptable safety profile of any product candidate once approved;

the scope, progress, timing, results and costs of researching and developing our NDCs and conducting preclinical and clinical trials;

results from ongoing as well as any future clinical trials;

significant and changing government regulation in the United States and abroad;

the costs, timing and outcome of regulatory review or approval of our NDCs in the United States and abroad;

our ability to establish and maintain strategic partnerships, licensing or other arrangements and the financial terms of such agreements;

establishment of arrangements with third party suppliers of raw materials and third party manufacturers of finished drug product;

our ability to manufacture, market, commercialize and achieve market acceptance for any of our NDCs that we are developing or may develop in the future;

the emergence of competing technologies and products and other adverse market developments; and

the cost of preparing, filing and prosecuting patent applications and maintaining, enforcing and defending intellectual property-related claims.

Any change in the outcome of any of these variables with respect to the development of a NDC could mean a significant change in the cost and timing associated with the development of that NDC. For example, if the FDA, or a comparable non-U.S. regulatory authority were to require us to conduct clinical trials beyond those that we currently anticipate will be required for the marketing authorization of a NDC, or if we experience significant delays in enrollment in any of our clinical trials, we could be required to expend significant additional financial resources and time to obtain marketing authorization.

As a result of the uncertainties discussed above, we are unable to determine when, or to what extent, we will generate revenues from the commercialization and sale of any of our NDCs. We anticipate that we will make determinations as to which additional programs to pursue and how much funding to direct to each program on an ongoing basis in response to the scientific and clinical data with respect to each NDC, as well as our ongoing assessment of the NDCs commercial potential. We will need to raise additional capital in the future in order to complete the development and commercialization of CRLX101 and CRLX301 and to fund the development of our other NDCs, if any.

General and Administrative Expenses

General and administrative expenses consist principally of salaries and related costs for personnel in our executive, finance, business development, marketing, legal and human resources functions. Other general and administrative expenses include patent

 

13


filing, patent prosecution, professional fees for legal, insurance, consulting, information technology, auditing and tax services and facility costs not otherwise included in research and development expenses.

We anticipate that our general and administrative expenses will increase in the future for, among others, the following reasons:

we expect to incur increased general and administrative expenses to support our research and development activities, which we expect to expand as we continue to pursue the development of our NDCs;

we expect our general and administrative expenses will continue to increase as a result of increased payroll, expanded infrastructure, higher consulting, legal, accounting and investor relations costs, director compensation and director and officer insurance premiums associated with being a public company; and

we may begin to incur expenses related to sales and marketing of our NDCs in anticipation of commercial launch before we receive regulatory approval of a NDC.

Interest Income

Interest income consists of interest earned on our cash and cash equivalents. The primary objective of our investment policy is capital preservation.

Interest Expense

Interest expense consists primarily of interest, amortization of debt discount and amortization of deferred financing costs associated with the Hercules Loan Agreement.  Interest expense also includes the write off of debt discount and deferred financing costs associated with the repayment in 2015 of the debt incurred under the Lighthouse Loan Agreement.  In 2014, interest expense consists primarily of interest, amortization of debt discount and amortization of deferred financing costs associated with the Lighthouse Loan Agreement and interest expense on our convertible notes.

Results of Operations

Comparison of Three Months Ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 (Unaudited)

The following table summarizes our consolidated results of operations for the three months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, together with the changes in those items in dollars and as a percentage (in thousands, except percentages):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

Change

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

Dollar

 

 

%

 

Revenue

 

$

 

 

$

33

 

 

$

(33

)

 

 

(100

)%

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

6,678

 

 

 

2,648

 

 

 

4,030

 

 

 

152

%

General and administrative

 

 

2,717

 

 

 

2,029

 

 

 

688

 

 

 

34

%

Loss from operations

 

 

(9,395

)

 

 

(4,644

)

 

 

(4,751

)

 

 

102

%

Other expense, net

 

 

(512

)

 

 

(2,759

)

 

 

2,247

 

 

 

(81

)%

Net loss

 

$

(9,907

)

 

$

(7,403

)

 

$

(2,504

)

 

 

34

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue.  There was no revenue recorded for the three months ended June 30, 2015.  For the three months ended June 30, 2014, revenue was $33,000 from two material transfer agreements which concluded in 2014. Pursuant to the agreements, we recorded revenue from payments we received in exchange for providing research services utilizing our proprietary technology.

Research and development. Research and development expense for the three months ended June 30, 2015, was $6.7 million compared to $2.6 million for the three months ended June 30, 2014, an increase of $4.1 million, or 152%.  The increase was primarily attributable to an increase in costs associated with the CRLX101 program.  The following table summarizes our research and development expense by program for the three months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, together with the change in spending by program in dollars and as a percentage (in thousands, except percentages):

 

14


 

 

 

Three Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

Change

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

Dollar

 

 

%

 

CRLX101

 

$

5,030

 

 

$

1,875

 

 

$

3,155

 

 

 

168

%

CRLX301

 

 

827

 

 

 

360

 

 

 

467

 

 

 

130

%

Dynamic Tumor Targeting platform

 

 

487

 

 

 

234

 

 

 

253

 

 

 

108

%

Overhead

 

 

334

 

 

 

179

 

 

 

155

 

 

 

87

%

Total research and development expense

 

$

6,678

 

 

$

2,648

 

 

$

4,030

 

 

 

152

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the three months ended June 30, 2015, CRLX101 program expenses increased by $3.2 million, or 168%, to $5.0 million compared to $1.9 million for the three months ended June 30, 2014.  The increase in CRLX101 program expenses was primarily attributable to costs associated with our ongoing RCC Trial, which was initiated in mid-2014, together with costs associated with ISTs. Clinical trial expenses increased $1.9 million reflecting an increase in CRO fees, investigator fees and costs associated with clinical sites and laboratories. Salary and benefits expenses increased $0.6 million reflecting increased headcount to support the CRLX101 program and the clinical trials. Chemistry, manufacturing, and controls, or CMC, costs increased $0.4 million reflecting increased activity to support current and future clinical development of CRLX101.

For the three months ended June 30, 2015, CRLX301 program expenses increased $0.4 million, or 130%, to $0.8 million compared to $0.4 million for the three months ended June 30, 2014.  The increase in CRLX301 program expense was primarily due to costs associated with the Phase 1 clinical trial that we initiated in December 2014. CRLX301 clinical trial expenses increased by $0.2 million for the three months ended June 30, 2015, compared to the prior year primarily due to CRO and laboratory costs. Salary and benefits expenses increased $0.1 million compared to the prior year reflecting increased headcount to support the CRLX301 program and the clinical trials. CMC and development expenses increased $0.1 million reflecting increased activity to support current and future clinical development of CRLX301.

Expenses associated with our Dynamic Tumor Targeting platform were $0.5 million for the three months ended June 30, 2015, an increase of $0.3 million, or 108%, compared to $0.2 million for the three months ended June 30, 2014.  The increase was primarily due to increased headcount in new discovery research.

General and administrative. General and administrative expense for the three months ended June 30, 2015, was $2.7 million compared to $2.0 million for the three months ended June 30, 2014, an increase of $0.7 million, or 34%. The increase in general and administrative costs was primarily due to the growth in our corporate infrastructure to support a larger public company.  Salaries and benefits, including stock-based compensation, increased $0.4 million for the three months ended June 30, 2015, reflecting increases in finance and accounting, legal and corporate communications.  Professional and consulting fees increased $0.1 million for the period compared to the prior year primarily due to board fees and other costs related to being a public company.  Other general and administrative expenses including facility and office expenses, dues and subscriptions, conferences, and travel increased for the three months ended June 30, 2015, compared to the prior year due to our overall growth.   

Other expense, net. Other expense, net for the three months ended June 30, 2015, was $0.5 million compared to $2.8 million for the three months ended June 30, 2014, a decrease of $2.3 million, or 81%.  The decrease in other expense, net, was primarily due to a $2.5 million loss on the conversion of our 2014 convertible notes, which was recorded in April 2014. The decrease was partially offset by a $0.3 million increase in interest expense to $0.5 million for the three months ended June 30, 2015, compared to $0.2 million for the three months ended June 30, 2014 due to a higher average debt balance for the period.  

Comparison of Six Months Ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 (Unaudited)

The following table summarizes our consolidated results of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, together with the changes in those items in dollars and as a percentage (in thousands, except percentages):

 

15


 

 

 

Six Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

Change

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

Dollar

 

 

%

 

Revenue

 

$

 

 

$

80

 

 

$

(80

)

 

 

(100

)%

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

11,699

 

 

 

4,143

 

 

 

7,556

 

 

 

182

%

General and administrative

 

 

5,398

 

 

 

3,539

 

 

 

1,859

 

 

 

53

%

Loss from operations

 

 

(17,097

)

 

 

(7,602

)

 

 

(9,495

)

 

 

125

%

Other expense, net

 

 

(1,238

)

 

 

(2,715

)

 

 

1,477

 

 

 

(54

)%

Net loss

 

$

(18,335

)

 

$

(10,317

)

 

$

(8,018

)

 

 

78

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue.  There was no revenue recorded for the six months ended June 30, 2015.  For the six months ended June 30, 2014, we recorded revenue of $80,000 from payments we received under two material transfer agreements. Pursuant to the agreements, we received payments in exchange for providing research services utilizing our proprietary technology.  Work under the agreements terminated in 2014.

Research and development. Research and development expense for the six months ended June 30, 2015, was $11.7 million compared to $4.1 million for the six months ended June 30, 2014, an increase of $7.6 million, or 182%.  The increase was primarily attributable to an increase in costs associated with the CRLX101 program.  The following table summarizes our research and development expense by program for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, together with the change in spending by program in dollars and as a percentage (in thousands, except percentages):

 

 

Six Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

Change

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

Dollar

 

 

%

 

CRLX101

 

$

8,372

 

 

$

2,768

 

 

$

5,604

 

 

 

202

%

CRLX301

 

 

1,715

 

 

 

524

 

 

 

1,191

 

 

 

227

%

Dynamic Tumor Targeting platform

 

 

935

 

 

 

514

 

 

 

421

 

 

 

82

%

Overhead

 

 

677

 

 

 

337

 

 

 

340

 

 

 

101

%

Total research and development expense

 

$

11,699

 

 

$

4,143

 

 

$

7,556

 

 

 

182

%

For the six months ended June 30, 2015, CRLX101 program expenses increased by $5.6 million, or 202%, to $8.4 million compared to $2.8 million for the six months ended June 30, 2014.  The increase in CRLX101 program expense was primarily attributable to costs associated with our ongoing RCC Trial, which was initiated in mid-2014, together with costs associated with ISTs. Clinical trial expenses increased $3.4 million reflecting an increase in CRO fees, investigator fees and costs associated with clinical sites and laboratories. Salary and benefits expenses increased $1.1 million compared to the prior year to support the CRLX101 development program and the clinical trials. CMC costs increased $0.8 million compared to the prior year reflecting increased activity to support current and future clinical development of CRLX101.

For the six months ended June 30, 2015, CRLX301 program expenses increased $1.2 million, or 227%, to $1.7 million compared to $0.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2014.  The increase in CRLX301 program expenses was primarily due to costs associated with the Phase 1 clinical trial that we initiated in December 2014. CRLX301 clinical trial expenses increased by $0.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015 compared to the prior year primarily due to CRO fees, costs associated with clinical sites and laboratory costs. Salary and benefits expenses increased $0.4 million to support the CRLX301 development program and the clinical trials. CMC and development expenses increased $0.3 million reflecting increased activity to support current and future clinical development.

Expenses associated with our Dynamic Tumor Targeting platform were $0.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015, an increase of $0.4 million, or 82%, compared to $0.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2014.  The increase is primarily due to increased headcount in new discovery research.

General and administrative. General and administrative expense for the six months ended June 30, 2015, was $5.4 million compared to $3.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2014, an increase of $1.9 million, or 53%. The increase in general and administrative costs was attributable to the growth in our corporate infrastructure to support a larger public company.  Salaries and benefits, including stock-based compensation, increased $0.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015, compared to the prior year, reflecting increases in finance and accounting, legal and corporate communications.  Professional and consulting fees increased by $0.5 million and insurance increased by $0.2 million for the period compared to the prior year primarily due to costs related to being a public company including board of director fees and insurance for directors and officers.  Other general and administrative

 

16


expenses including facility and office expenses, dues and subscriptions, conferences, and travel increased $0.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015, compared to the prior year due to our overall growth.     

Other expense, net. Other expense, net for the six months ended June 30, 2015, was $1.2 million compared to $2.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2014, a decrease of $1.5 million, or 54%.  The decrease in other expense, net, was primarily due to a $2.5 million loss on the conversion of our 2014 convertible notes, which was recorded in April 2014. Interest expense was $1.2 million and $0.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, respectively, an increase of $0.5 million, or 70%.  For the six months ended June 30, 2015, interest expense included $1.0 million associated with the Hercules Loan Agreement, including $0.2 million for the amortization of debt discount and deferred financing costs, and $0.2 million for the write off of debt discount and deferred financing costs associated with the repayment of the Lighthouse Loan Agreement. Interest expense for the six months ended June 30, 2014 included $0.2 million of interest on our convertible notes and $0.3 million of interest and $0.2 million for the amortization of debt discount and deferred financing costs associated with the Lighthouse Loan Agreement. Other expense, net, for the six months ended June 30, 2014 included a $0.5 million adjustment to the fair value of our outstanding preferred stock warrant liability which was recorded as other income.  

Liquidity and Capital Resources

From our incorporation through June 30, 2015, we raised an aggregate of $224.6 million to fund our operations, of which $84.2 million was from the sale of preferred stock, $59.9 million was from the IPO, $37.2 million was from the Secondary Offering, $17.3 million was from the sale of convertible promissory notes, $25.0 million was from borrowings under loan and security agreements and $1.0 million was from the private placement of our common stock to Hercules. As of June 30, 2015, we had cash and cash equivalents of approximately $85.5 million.

Indebtedness

On January 8, 2015, we entered into the Hercules Loan Agreement and borrowed $15.0 million from Hercules. We used a portion of those proceeds to repay our outstanding indebtedness under the Lighthouse Loan Agreement.

The Hercules Loan Agreement provides for up to three separate tranches of borrowings, the first of which was funded in the amount of $15.0 million on January 8, 2015. We may draw the second tranche of up to $5.0 million, subject to the satisfaction of customary funding conditions, on or prior to December 15, 2015, provided that we meet certain clinical milestones specified in the Hercules Loan Agreement. We may draw the third tranche of up to $6.0 million at no less than $3.0 million per draw and subject to the satisfaction of customary funding conditions, on or after September 30, 2015 but before December 15, 2015, provided that between January 8, 2015, and December 15, 2015, we have received net cash proceeds of at least $40.0 million from our issuance and sale of equity securities and/or upfront cash payments from one or more strategic corporate partnerships.

Our indebtedness under the Hercules Loan Agreement will mature on July 1, 2018. Each advance under the Hercules Loan Agreement accrues interest at a floating per annum rate equal to the greater of (i) 7.30% or (ii) the sum of 7.30% plus the prime rate minus 5.75%. The Hercules Loan Agreement provides for interest-only payments on a monthly basis until December 31, 2015. The interest only period may be extended at our option for a three month period if we attain certain clinical milestones specified in the Hercules Loan Agreement, and for an additional three month period if we attain certain clinical milestones and receive net cash proceeds of at least $30.0 million from the issuance and sale of our equity securities and/or upfront cash payments from one or more strategic corporate partnerships. Thereafter, payments will be payable monthly in equal installments of principal and interest to fully amortize the outstanding principal over the remaining term of the loan, subject to recalculation upon a change in the prime rate. We may prepay the indebtedness under the Hercules Loan Agreement in whole or in part upon seven business days’ prior written notice to Hercules. Any such prepayment is subject to a prepayment charge of (i) 3.0% if such prepayment occurs on or before January 8, 2016, (ii) 2.0% if such prepayment occurs after January 8, 2016, but on or before January 8, 2017, and (iii) 1.0% if such prepayment occurs after January 8, 2017. Amounts outstanding during an event of default are payable upon Hercules’ demand and shall accrue interest at an additional rate of 5.0% per annum of the past due amount outstanding. At the end of the loan term (whether at maturity, by prepayment in full or otherwise), we shall pay a final end of term charge to Hercules in the amount of 6.7% of the aggregate original principal amount advanced by Hercules.

The Hercules Loan Agreement is secured by substantially all of our assets other than our intellectual property. We have also granted Hercules a negative pledge with respect to our intellectual property, which, among other things, prohibits us from selling, transferring, assigning, mortgaging, pledging, leasing, granting a security interest in or otherwise encumbering our intellectual property. The Hercules Loan Agreement includes restrictive covenants that may restrict our ability to obtain further debt or equity financing.

 

17


Lighthouse Loan Agreement.  In 2011, we entered into the Lighthouse Loan Agreement which permitted us to borrow up to an aggregate principal amount of $10.0 million. We borrowed $5.0 million in March 2012 and an additional $5.0 million in August 2012.  Interest accrued under the Lighthouse Loan Agreement at an annual rate of 8.25%.  As of December 31, 2014, there was $3.3 million in aggregate principal amount outstanding under the Lighthouse Loan Agreement.  We repaid in full our outstanding indebtedness under the Lighthouse Loan Agreement and terminated the agreement on January 8, 2015. There were no prepayment charges associated with the early repayment of the loan.

Convertible Notes.  In 2014, we issued and sold convertible promissory notes in an aggregate principal amount of $8.5 million, to certain of our stockholders and one additional purchaser. The 2014 convertible notes accrued interest at an annual rate of 7%. In connection with the completion of our IPO, all principal and accrued interest under our 2014 convertible notes converted into an aggregate of 1,582,931 shares of our common stock, at 77.5% of the IPO price, or $5.43 per share.

Plan of Operations and Future Funding Requirements

Our primary uses of capital are, and we expect will continue to be, compensation and related expenses, clinical trial costs, contract manufacturing services, third-party clinical research and development services, laboratory and related supplies, legal and other regulatory expenses and general overhead costs.

We believe that our cash and cash equivalents as of June 30, 2015, will enable us to fund our operating expenses, debt service and capital expenditure requirements into 2017.  We have based this estimate on assumptions that may prove to be wrong, and we could use our capital resources sooner than we currently expect. Our future capital requirements will depend on many factors, including:

the number and development requirements of the NDCs we pursue;

the scope, progress, timing, results and costs of researching and developing our NDCs, and conducting preclinical studies and clinical trials;

the costs, timing and outcome of regulatory review of our NDCs;

the cost and timing of future commercialization activities, including product manufacturing, marketing, sales and distribution, for any of our NDCs for which we receive marketing approval;

the revenue, if any, received from commercial sales of any NDCs for which we receive marketing approval;

our ability to establish and maintain strategic partnerships, licensing or other arrangements and the financial terms of such agreements;

the scope, costs and timing of the manufacture, supply and distribution of our drug candidates for preclinical and clinical trials;

the costs and timing of preparing, filing and prosecuting patent applications, maintaining and enforcing our intellectual property rights and defending any intellectual property-related claims;

the extent to which we acquire or in-license other medicines and technology;

our headcount growth and associated costs; and

the costs of operating as a public company.

Identifying potential NDCs and conducting preclinical testing and clinical trials is a time-consuming, expensive and uncertain process that takes years to complete, and we may never generate the necessary data or results required to obtain regulatory approval and achieve product sales. In addition, our NDCs, if approved, may not achieve commercial success. Until such time, if ever, as we can generate substantial product revenues, we expect to finance our cash needs through a combination of equity offerings, debt financings and revenue from collaboration arrangements. To the extent that we raise additional capital through the future sale of equity or debt, the ownership interest of our stockholders will be diluted, and the terms of these securities may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect the rights of our existing common stockholders. If we raise additional funds through collaboration arrangements in the future, we may have to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies, future revenue streams or drug candidates or grant licenses on terms that may not be favorable to us. If we are unable to raise additional funds through equity or debt financings when needed, we may be required to delay, limit, reduce or terminate our product development or future commercialization efforts or grant rights to develop and market drug candidates that we would otherwise prefer to develop and market ourselves.

 

18


Cash Flows

The following table sets forth the primary sources and uses of cash for each period set forth below (in thousands):

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

$

(15,738

)

 

$

(7,895

)

Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities

 

 

(337

)

 

 

2

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

50,377

 

 

 

66,676

 

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

$

34,302

 

 

$

58,783

 

 

Net Cash Used in Operating Activities

The net use of cash in each period resulted primarily from our net losses adjusted for non-cash charges and changes in components of working capital.

Net cash used in operating activities was $15.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015, compared with $7.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2014, an increase of $7.8 million, or 99%. The increase in net cash used in operating activities resulted primarily from an increase in operating expenses of $9.4 million partially offset by an increase in stock compensation expense of $0.6 million and a change in components of working capital of $0.9 million.

Net Cash Used in Investing Activities

Net cash used in investing activities was $0.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015, compared to net cash provided by investing activities of $2,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2014. For the six months ended June 30, 2015, cash used in investing activities included a $0.2 million increase in restricted cash to collateralize a stand-by letter of credit issued as a security deposit on a new facility lease.  Cash used in investing activities for the purchase of lab equipment and employee computers increased $69,000 to $0.1 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015, compared to $38,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2014.  Cash provided by investing activities for the six months ended June 30, 2014, included proceeds for the sale of property and equipment of $40,000.  

Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities

Net cash provided by financing activities was $50.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015, compared with $66.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2014. Net cash provided by financing activities for the six months ended June 30, 2015, was primarily due to net proceeds of $37.2 million from our Secondary Offering, proceeds of $15.0 million from our initial borrowing under the Hercules Loan Agreement, proceeds of $1.0 million from the sale of our common stock in a private placement to Hercules and proceeds of $1.5 million from the exercise of stock options.  Net cash provided by financing activities for the six months ended June 30, 2015, was reduced by $3.9 million paid to repay in full the Lighthouse Loan Agreement and cash paid for debt issuance costs of $0.4 million.  For the six months ended June 30, 2014, net cash provided by financing activities was primarily due to net proceeds of $59.9 million from our IPO and proceeds of $8.5 million from the sale of convertible promissory notes.  Net cash provided by financing activities for the six months ended June 30, 2014, was reduced by payments of $1.6 million under the Lighthouse Loan Agreement and cash paid for debt issuance costs of $0.1 million.

Contractual Obligations and Contingent Liabilities

On July 9, 2015, we entered into a lease agreement with AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals Limited Partnership for approximately 22,992 square feet of laboratory and office space in Waltham, Massachusetts.  The lease commences on December 28, 2015, and expires on February 28, 2021, subject to our three-year extension option.  During each of the first two years of the term, our annual base rent will be $689,760.  Thereafter, the annual base rent will increase annually for the remainder of the term.  In addition to the base rent, we are also responsible for our share of the operating expenses, utility costs and real estate taxes. The base rent for the extension term, if any, will be the greater of the fair market rent or the base rent for the lease year immediately preceding the commencement of the extension year.

On January 8, 2015, we borrowed $15.0 million under the Hercules Loan Agreement and used a portion of those proceeds to repay our total outstanding indebtedness of $3.6 million under the Lighthouse Loan Agreement, which has been terminated.  Borrowings under the Hercules Loan Agreement bear interest at 7.3%. The Hercules Loan Agreement provides for interest only payments until December 31, 2015, subject to a potential extension of the interest only period in accordance with the terms of the Hercules Loan Agreement.  Thereafter, amortization payments will be payable in equal monthly installments of principal and interest

 

19


to fully amortize the outstanding principal over the remaining term of the loan.  At the end of the loan term (whether at maturity, by prepayment in full or otherwise), we will pay a final end of term charge to Hercules in the amount of 6.7% of the aggregate original principal amount advanced by Hercules.

As of June 30, 2015, there were no material changes, outside of the ordinary course of business, in our outstanding contractual obligations from those disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014, other than as described in the preceding paragraphs.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We did not have during the periods presented, and we do not currently have, any off-balance sheet arrangements, as defined under applicable SEC rules.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In April 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued Accounting Standards Update, or ASU, 2015-03, “Interest – Imputation of Interest”, or ASU 2015-03. To simplify presentation of debt issuance costs, ASU 2015-03 requires that debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the carrying amount of that debt liability, consistent with debt discounts.  ASU 2015-03 is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning January 1, 2016 and is not expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

We are exposed to market risk related to changes in interest rates. As of June 30, 2015, we had cash and cash equivalents of approximately $85.5 million, consisting primarily of investments in money market funds and certificates of deposit. Our primary exposure to market risk is interest rate sensitivity, which is affected by changes in the general level of United States interest rates, particularly because our investments are in cash and cash equivalents. Due to the short-term duration of our investment portfolio and the low risk profile of our investments, an immediate 10% change in interest rates would not have a material effect on the fair market value of our investment portfolio. As of June 30, 2015, we were also subject to interest rate risk from our indebtedness under the Hercules Loan Agreement that accrues interest at a floating per annum rate equal to the greater of (i) 7.30% or (ii) the sum of 7.30% plus the prime rate minus 5.75%.  A 10% increase in interest rates at June 30, 2015, would not have a material effect on our annual interest expense.

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures.

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

Our management, under the supervision and with the participation of our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, has evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.  The term “disclosure controls and procedures,” as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, means controls and other procedures of a company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the company’s management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures.

Management recognizes that any disclosure controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives. Our disclosure controls and procedures have been designed to provide reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives. Based on such evaluation, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level as of June 30, 2015.

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

No change in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act) occurred during the six months ended June 30, 2015, that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 


 

20


PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

Our business is subject to numerous risks. The following important factors, among others, could cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed in forward-looking statements made by us or on our behalf in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and other filings with the SEC, press releases, communications with investors and oral statements. Actual future results may differ materially from those anticipated in our forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

Risks Related to Our Financial Position and Need for Additional Capital

We will need substantial additional funding. If we are unable to raise capital when needed, we could be forced to delay, reduce or eliminate our product development programs or commercialization efforts.

We expect our expenses to increase in connection with our ongoing activities, particularly as we advance the clinical development of CRLX101 and CRLX301 and continue research and development and initiate additional clinical trials of, and seek regulatory approval for, these and other future product candidates. In addition, if we obtain regulatory approval for any of our product candidates, we expect to incur significant commercialization expenses related to product manufacturing, marketing, sales and distribution. In particular, the costs that may be required for the manufacture of any product candidate that receives marketing approval may be substantial, and manufacturing our nanoparticle-drug conjugates, or NDCs, for commercial sale will require expensive and specialized facilities, processes and materials. Furthermore, relative to previous years when we operated as a private company, we expect to incur significant additional costs associated with operating as a public company. Accordingly, we will need to obtain substantial additional funding in connection with our continuing operations. If we are unable to raise capital when needed or on attractive terms, we could be forced to delay, reduce or eliminate our research and development programs or any future commercialization efforts.

We plan to use our current cash and cash equivalents to fund our ongoing research and development efforts. We will be required to expend significant funds in order to advance development of CRLX101, CRLX301 and our other potential product candidates. Our existing cash and cash equivalents will not be sufficient to fund all of the efforts that we plan to undertake, such as additional randomized trials of CRLX101 or CRLX301. Accordingly, we will be required to obtain further funding through public or private equity offerings, debt financings, collaborations or licensing arrangements or other sources. Adequate and additional funding may not be available to us on acceptable terms or at all.

On January 8, 2015 we entered into a loan and security agreement, which we refer to as the Hercules Loan Agreement, with Hercules Technology Growth Capital, Inc., or Hercules, and drew the first tranche of $15.0 million under the Hercules Loan Agreement.  Although the Hercules Loan Agreement provides for two additional tranches in an aggregate amount of up to $11.0 million that we may borrow if we meet certain clinical and financing milestones, we may fail to meet these conditions and be unable to obtain this funding.

If we elect to obtain any additional debt financing, our ability to do so may be limited by covenants we have made under the Hercules Loan Agreement and our pledge to Hercules of substantially all of our assets, other than our intellectual property, as collateral. We have also granted Hercules a negative pledge with respect to our intellectual property, which, among other things, prohibits us from selling, transferring, assigning, mortgaging, pledging, leasing, granting a security interest in or otherwise encumbering our intellectual property. This negative pledge could further limit our ability to obtain additional debt financing. Our failure to raise capital as and when needed would have a negative impact on our financial condition and our ability to pursue our business strategy.

On April 10, 2015 we closed an underwritten public offering, or the Secondary Offering, of 6,716,000 shares of common stock, including 876,000 shares sold pursuant to the full exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares, at a public offering price of $6.00 per share. The gross proceeds to us from the Secondary Offering were approximately $40.3 million, before deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses payable by us.

We believe that our cash and cash equivalents as of June 30, 2015 will enable us to fund our operating expenses, debt service and capital expenditure requirements into 2017. We have based this estimate on assumptions that may prove to be wrong, and we could use our capital resources sooner than we currently expect. Our future capital requirements will depend on many factors, including:

·

the number and development requirements of the product candidates we pursue;

 

21


·

the scope, progress, timing, results and costs of researching and developing our product candidates, and conducting preclinical and clinical trials;

·

the costs, timing and outcome of regulatory review of our product candidates;

·

the cost and timing of future commercialization activities, including product manufacturing, marketing, sales and distribution, for any of our product candidates for which we receive marketing approval;

·

the revenue, if any, received from commercial sales of any product candidates for which we receive marketing approval;

·

our ability to establish and maintain strategic partnerships, licensing or other arrangements and the financial terms of such agreements;

·

the costs and timing of preparing, filing and prosecuting patent applications, maintaining and enforcing our intellectual property rights and defending any intellectual property-related claims;

·

the extent to which we acquire or in-license other medicines and technology;

·

our headcount growth and associated costs; and

·

the costs of operating as a public company.

Identifying potential product candidates and conducting preclinical testing and clinical trials is a time-consuming, expensive and uncertain process that takes years to complete, and we may never generate the necessary data or results required to obtain regulatory approval and achieve product sales. In addition, our product candidates, if approved, may not achieve commercial success. Our commercial revenues, i